Sankt Martin, the Alsace and into Basel

Well it has been a pretty spectacular week riding up Basel slowly meandering my way between historic cities, vineyards, old villages, great campsites and three countries.

Not long after my last post I arrived in the small wine village of Sankt Martin in Germany which is nestled into a valley surrounded by forests of pine and chestnuts. Every building in the village is heavily involved in producing or consuming wine, typically both, and I was luck enough to meet a new friend Ingrid at the campsite my Garmin choose for me. A native german, but with a mixed accent mostly consisting of Irish and Canadian twangs we spent a few days hanging out and chatting about adventures. As with so many long term travelers (in this case through guiding) Ingrid seemed to be able to recall visits to every place I have been to on this trip which only served to provide inspiration to see some of the many things I have missed!

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From Sankt Martin it was time to head south, and the French Alsace wine region beckoned with its beautifully marked cycle routes twisting through the freshly harvested vines that became more golden and autumnal as I headed further south. These trails and flat roads were to dominate the rest of the week with great little interludes to such beautiful cities as Strasbourg and Colmar. I have a feeling I have been particularly lucky with the sunny weather and enough cloud to stop me getting too sun burnt over the past week.

Last night I finally arrived in Basel which is a pretty spectacular city full of old buildings, bustling streets all situated on a magnificent cliff lined bend in the Rhine. Switzerland is phenomenally expensive, but Basel is so close to France and Germany that tomorrow morning I’ll ride over the border to do a big grocery shop and then I’ll be catching a train somewhere to go hiking!

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Guest Cooking Posts

Hi Guys!

As many of you know I like to cook, almost as much as I like to eat in fact! A good friend (with whom I have shared many cups of delicious tea) has started up a cooking blog called Caitlicious Cooking.

So in the theme of sharing I am going to be adding some of my favourite recipes to the site. I will be adding lots of dairy free recipes that I have worked out over time, as well as recipes that are just awesome.

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Drunken Devonshire Pasties

So awesome. Three types of stout went into these!

The most delicious pasties around.

The most delicious pasties around.

So we did make these up as we went along, but roughly the process was…

  1. Slow cook 6 lamb shanks in a mix of Amber Ale and Stout for 4 hours. We used 1x Squires Amber Ale and 1/3 of a Kilkenny at this stage. We recommend testing the mix of beers prior to adding to the shanks.
  2. Make a sour-cream based semi-short pastry, about 3-4 cups of flour worth.
  3. Remove lamb meat from shank. Add remaining Kilkenny, 6 potatoes, and 1 bottle of dark stout (Paddy’stout from Ireland). Transfer mixture to a pressure cooked for 30 minutes.
  4. Eat remaining meat off the lamb shanks in a way reminiscent of Neanderthals.
  5. Cut pastry into four lots, roll each one out and layer as per puff pastry using olive oil and spices to layers. Return to fridge.
  6. Steam carrots, swede, fennel, turnip until cooked. Transfer to a bowl and then season and butter to taste.
  7. Shred pressure cooked lamb and potatoes muscle strands are broken down.
  8. Eat remaining meat of any remaining lamb shanks. Test all products thoroughly.
  9. Assemble pasties.
  10. Bake at 180C until delicious.